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Early Childhood Research November 2022

Your monthly collection of the latest and current research in early childhood.

This month we've focussed on 3 key themes emerging from OFSTED's Early Years Research Review published earlier this month: curriculum, children's interests and communication and language development.


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1. The importance of play in natural environments for children’s language development: an explorative study in early childhood education (2022)

Jannette Prins, Femke van der Wilt, Sofia van Santen, Chiel van der Veen & Dieuwke Hovinga (2022) The importance of play in natural environments for children’s language development: an explorative study in early childhood education, International Journal of Early Years Education, DOI: 10.1080/09669760.2022.2144147


3 key takeaways:

  • A research study in Dutch primary schools where children's utterances over 10 minute period were observed when playing outdoors

  • Nature based play environments increased the use of complex language, including that of science and maths

  • Discusses developmental benefits of natural environments and explores theories linking language use and outdoor play


2. Curriculum making with young children (2022)

Dr Liz Chesworth


3 key takeaways:

  • Relational pedagogy is central to creating a curriculum

  • Meaning and relevance are key functions of children's experience within the dynamic process of 'being attuned, being responsive, building connections and being inclusive'

  • Children's funds of knowledge are invited into the setting and encapsulate the knowledge, skills and values of others.


3. Working theories: Current understandings and future directions. Helen Hedges

Hedges, H. (2021). Working theories: Current understandings and future directions. Early Childhood Folio, 25(1), 32–37. doi:10.18296/ecf.0093


3 key takeaways:

  • Working theories are a holistic outcome of Te Whariki: New Zealand's early childhood curriculum

  • Children's experiences and interactions with the world are what form working theories. It encourages the values of individualism and uniqueness of the child

  • The adult role is to listen and support the co-creation of children's inquiries

 


Join us in our 'chats about early childhood research group' over the next few weeks as we invite you to ponder on the content of the 3 research articles featured in this month's research round-up helping you to translate research into your early childhood practice.



 

Psst...did you see our latest blog post this week too?


Read our latest blog on language-rich environments and download your free top tips on 'how to build young children's vocabulary' today.

 

Thanks for reading!


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